Learning is a fundamental activity for children (and for ESRs as well!)

[By: Valentina Barone]

By the time you are hired as a researcher everyone expects you to be an expert. There’s no way you would get that position if you weren’t smart enough, right? Researchers – also the early stage ones – are supposed to show a high level of expertise and trustworthiness, associated with multiple skills like initiative and independence. A self-standing person who is able to dive into the intricate ocean of science and who can return to the surface with extraordinary results to share with the mainland. It sounds so fancy and respectful to read the initials “PhD” beside someone’s name. “Yes, I must definitely own enough competence if I got to this point, as a PhD candidate I am part of an intellectual élite after all”. This is what I sometimes tell myself in one of the rare excess of self-esteem I have.

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Mum, is this cliff safe to climb?

[By: Julia Mermier]

In 1960, Gibson and Walk came up with a brilliant idea to investigate depth perception in infants. They built this “visual cliff” apparatus, consisting in a checkerboard cloth covered by a Plexiglas board on which the infant could crawl.  On one side of the apparatus, the cloth was positioned right below the transparent board, while on the other side, the cloth was placed 1.2m deeper, giving the illusion of depth.

 

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Testing update

[By: Linda]

In this blog post, I thought it would be nice to look back at the past six months. It has been a hectic but fun time. Every day I was lucky enough to work with cute little three-month-old infants. Although there were moments that were not as much fun, such as smelling like baby spit up almost every single day, I really enjoyed the testing period.

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On the importance of MOTION

[By: Iara de Almeida]

This is July 2019. By now all of us ESR’s have been PhD candidates at our universities for 9 months, we are at the brink of our careers. One foot in, but still rubbing our eyes to make sure it is indeed true. All is new and wonderful. Every setback is a challenge to be conquered. But, when the day ends and the “dragons” of MATLAB or Python or Experimental Design are put down and work to our advantage, who are we but just a couple of young adults – kids, let’s face it – trying to make it in Research. This idea of balance has troubled me since the start.

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How to make a fussy eater (or not)

[By: Aude Carteron]

Do you also find yourself surprised when meeting someone who hates tomatoes or chocolate, and then shrug it off with a ‘well, that’s rare but there’s no accounting for taste’? Some weeks ago I decided to put on an apron and… use my favourite search engine to figure out ‘What makes us like… what we like’, and how it sheds light on why some parenting advice works better than other.

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What happens when you look into your baby’s eyes?

[By: Sayaka Fujita]

If you have spent time with a young baby, you probably know how babies are good at “staring”. When your baby looks into your eyes, you would probably look straight back into your baby’s eyes, smiling – making direct eye contact with them. Have you ever wondered – why they stare at you so much, and what happens in your baby’s brain when you look into your baby’s eyes?

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Relocating and adjusting to a new city

[By: Victoria Licht]

In this blog series we have heard from almost all the ESRs, talking about the challenges we encountered in our research and the progress we have made the last 7 months.  While all of us have moved from different countries to be at our present university, some of us have had minimal problems adjusting to our new city and others like myself needed some time to get use to our new home.

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Developing collaborations between academia and industry

[By: Chiara Capparini]

As you may already know, the MOTION network is made up by a diverse team of experts and early stage researchers mixing both academic and industrial expertise. In this blog post, I am going to discuss with you my really fresh experience developing collaboration between my host University, Lancaster University, and an industrial partner, Smart Eye.

Read moreDeveloping collaborations between academia and industry