Do babies know if you are a helpful person? Here’s what we found.

[By: Sayaka Kidby]

You may have heard the phrase that babies are little scientists or active learners. They seem to be dependent upon other people in so many ways; they need to be fed, they need to be moved (before they start crawling) and they need to be soothed when they get upset. But at the same time, they have this remarkable ability to learn an incredible amount by looking around the world and hearing other people.

What is impressive is that they do not seem to simply take in everything they see or hear [1]. Previous research has shown that babies and toddlers can choose whom to learn from. For example, copying other people’s behaviour (imitation) is an important way of learning for little ones. They only imitate actions of those who previously performed it competently and confidently, but not actions of those who seemed uncertain about what they were doing [1,2].

Much less is known about whether this selective learning occurs in much younger babies, whose motor skills are still limited.

Read moreDo babies know if you are a helpful person? Here’s what we found.

Why we want to research baby brains?

[By: Sayaka Kidby]

In my last blog post, I wrote about the difficulties of collecting good brain data from babies. It is a challenge, so you may have been thinking, why bother at all?

Some people say babies are boring – they look like doing nothing other than staring (and crying, sleeping and being fed). For me, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Babies are always looking, listening and learning. In short, there is always something going on in their brain. We collect brain data to find out exactly what is happening.

Read moreWhy we want to research baby brains?

3 things to know about this brain cap (or EEG, or electroencephalogram)

[By: Sayaka Kidby]

When visiting our babylab in Lancaster, some people say, “I’m here to do a study with a cap like a jellyfish”. Then I know they are here for my study. Yes, I use this jellyfish cap, called EEG (or electroencephalogram, to be more precise), to monitor baby’s brain activity.

A cap which monitors brain activity sounds cool – but what exactly does it do? When was it invented, by whom, and what can it tell us? In this month’s blog, I’ll talk about three things about EEG, as well as three reasons we should be bothered to measure brain activities despite all the challenges to get good data from cheeky little ones.

Read more3 things to know about this brain cap (or EEG, or electroencephalogram)

What happens when you look into your baby’s eyes?

[By: Sayaka Kidby]

If you have spent time with a young baby, you probably know how babies are good at “staring”. When your baby looks into your eyes, you would probably look straight back into your baby’s eyes, smiling – making direct eye contact with them. Have you ever wondered – why they stare at you so much, and what happens in your baby’s brain when you look into your baby’s eyes?

Read moreWhat happens when you look into your baby’s eyes?